Goodyear's Virtual Reality Driving Test Determines How Distracted Drivers Are - VR Life

Virtual Reality Driving Test to Determine How Distracted Drivers Are

Virtual Reality Driving Test

Drivers can be distracted in many numerous ways. There are friends who are in the car to chat with and mobile phones buzzing with texts, calls, and alerts. Outside the car there are catchy signboards, interesting-looking pedestrians, and some unprecedented scenarios that beg for attention. This often leads to accidents, destroying properties and claiming lives.

Distractions have always been one of the main culprits, but there has never been a way to determine how distracted those behind the wheel actually are. At least not until Goodyear came up with one.

Goodyear Introduces New Virtual Reality Driving Test

Tire manufacturer Goodyear has designed a virtual reality driving test to reveal how drivers are distracted by various things while driving. The test can be taken on high-end mobile phones and could be enhanced with the use of a virtual reality device like Google Cardboard.

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VR Driving Test

Developed with the help of the Driving Instructors Association (DIA), the virtual reality driving test can be accessed at www.drivingacademy.goodyear.co.uk. It is advised to put on headset while playing the game, as it uses sound to communicate a lot of things.

Users can navigate through various scenarios like town, city, and countryside. They then focus on a yellow dot as they are distracted by numerous things throughout the trip. There are key things like pedestrians, hazards, warning signs, and approaching traffic to focus on. They lose lives if they get distracted by texts and passengers or hit oncoming traffic. If they lose a life, they have to answer a driving theory question to continue the game.

A survey shows that young drivers from the ages of 18 to 24 are more at risk of car crashes than experienced drivers, as they are overconfident and often misjudge circumstances. In a research by the University of Waikato in New Zealand, it was found that the frontal lobe of the brain that helps control impulses isn’t fully developed until the mid-20s. Thus young drivers are more likely to do more crazy things on impulse. They are more likely to drink or get high while driving, over speed, and forget to fasten their seatbelts.

 

Young Driver

It was also revealed that over 23% of young drivers have almost been involved in an accident due to distractions. An alarming 42% have used a mobile phone while driving, 28% have texted a friend while driving, 10% admitted to using social networks while driving, and 25% of them have admitted to using music streaming sites like Pandora and Spotify while driving.

Fashion is also a major distraction for young ones, as many of them take time to groom themselves while driving. It was found out that 13% apply makeup while ob the wheel, and 11% style their hair.

Teenage Driver with Friends

Friends are also distracting for teenage drivers. The study had it that 25% of young drivers admitted that their driving is worse with friends in the car, and 33% feel more under pressure when with friends in the car. Also, 23% of males tend to over speed to show off, while 14% of females admit to doing the same thing.

“Peer pressure is a strong influence on young people today, but by not approaching the subject of poor driving, it is putting themselves, the driver, and other road users at risk,” Kate Rock of Goodyear Tyres UK said. “No one should be made to feel uncomfortable whilst a passenger in any vehicle, whether the driver is older or younger. It’s vital to speak up if you see a driver is distracted so that we, as a nation, begin to view safe driving as the celebrated way to drive—for all ages—and work to reduce road crash statistics.”

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